Old news from Armidale and New England

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Posts Tagged ‘tenterfield

Mail coach capsized

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Tuesday 9 August 1910, The Sydney Morning Herald

CASINO, Monday.

On Sunday morning the Coach from Casino to Tenterfield met with an accident, which delayed it four and a half hours. The coach had a big load-of mail matter and three passengers, besides the ordinary driver (Brereton) and a relief driver. When. coming down the foot of Sandiland’s Range, a very steep and twisting road, the brake gave way. The coach ran on at a good speed, and the swaying caused the coach to turn over. None of the passengers were injured. The two drivers, however, were pinned under the coach. Assistance was obtained from the Sandiland’s Hotel and the drivers were extricated., Brereton had one of his feet burt, badly, and his nose cut. The other driver was severely shaken, but proceeded to Tabulam with Mr. Brown, of the Sandilands Hotel, who took the coach on. Brereton stayed at Sandilands.

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August 10, 2010 at 8:01 pm

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Special Mining Wardens appointed

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Tuesday 9 August 1910, The Sydney Morning Herald

Some time ago a number of special mining wardens were appointed to take charge of districts where it is impracticable for the resident police magistrates to attend to the duties of that office. The constitution of the districts in of a temporary nature, some being of considerable extent. Glen Innes, for instance, embraces Drake, Inverell, Tenterfield, Armidale, Hillgrove, and other northern mining localities. In the meantime, one of the wardens, Mr. W. Perry, will have his headquarters at Glen Innes, Mr. A. B. C. Barker, at Bathurst. Mr George James, at Cootamundra, and Mr. O. R. Williams, at Goulburn. They will commence duty in their new appointments on August 15. The scheme, if successful, will probably be further extended. So far it is experimental. Cobar and Broken Hill are not included in it, as, owing to their position, apart from other fields, it is not considered necessary to have special wardens.

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August 8, 2010 at 8:00 pm

Tin mining near Armidale

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Tuesday 3 September 1872, The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser

(From the Armidale Express, Aug. 31.)

It is reported in Armidale that two gentlemen resident here have supplied the cash to lease 1400 acres of mineral land on Strathbogie, near Tenterfield. It is stated that Mr. Elliott, late R. C. Schoolmaster, was the discoverer. We understand there has been a new discovery of mineral land some 90 miles to the west of Inverell.

The reputation of Kangaroo Hills as a tin country has been very fluctuating, and some have earned disparagement so far as to report it a ” duffer.” Nevertheless it has not been altogether disregarded, as a prospector in the present week brought thence to Armidale some specimens of supposed tin ore, which he showed to Mr J Moore. This gentleman, liking their appearance, carried them to Mr Herzog’s to have them tested. Mr H. being from home, Mr M. got a lad to prepare the furnace, and he then took a specimen of four ozs., which be melted-it was his first attempt-and obtained two ozs. of good tin and 12 or 13 globules of a yellow metal These he subsequently showed to Dr. Spasshatt and Mr. Wright, at Messrs. Richardson and Co.’s store, and both these gentlemen having submitted them to a chemical test, pronounced them copper. We saw one flattened out to the size of a threepenny piece. The metal appeared to be very pure. Mr. Moore has taken up a considerable area of the indicated locality.

On Tuesday we saw upwards of a cwt. of extraordinary fine specimens of lode tin ore from the Truro claim, at Cope’s Creek. They were in the possession of Mr. R. S. Jenkins, one of the partners in the claim. On the evening of the same day, packed in two canvas bags, they were forwarded to Sydney, as samples of the ore-producing capabilities of the claim. Some of the specimens contained a layer of pure tin within a crust of cement, and one piece, said to be from the wall of the reef, about three inches in thickness and from eight to nine square, was as much as one could manage to lift about with one hand. It appears to be only within the last few days that the lode was found, though it has been sought for over several months. It was discovered, we understand, in making a final prospect, and what it has yielded some four feet below the surface is said to be as rich as the best products of the Glen.

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July 21, 2010 at 8:06 pm

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More gold at Drake

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Saturday 8 January 1910, The Sydney Morning Herald

A GOLD DISCOVERY.

TENTERFIELD, Friday.

Another rich gold find is reported from Gerard’s Crook, Drake. It is a considerable distance south of the previous find.

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July 6, 2010 at 6:08 am

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Returned soldiers

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Saturday 22 September 1900, The Sydney Morning Herald

TENTERFIELD, Friday.

Sergeant-major McAlister and Trooper Dawson were met at the railway station to-day by the aldermen, Border Caledonian Society, Mounted Rifles, Fire Brigade band, and a number of citizens, and driven to the Royal Hotel and formally welcomed.

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June 25, 2010 at 6:06 am

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Wallangarra mail train

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Friday 17 November 1933, The Courier-Mail (Brisbane)

Sir, – Now that New South Wales authorities have definitely decided not to interfere with the present mall train arrangements between Brisbane and Sydney, via Wallangarra, it behoves the whole of the citizens in the area between Toowoomba and Tamworth inclusive to do their best to build up the service by using it on every possible occasion. All the Chambers of Commerce and Progress Associations interested should keep on exercising their influence to assist the service and try to improve it in every possible way – make it more attractive and encourage tourists and others to travel over the route at least one way on their visit to this State. Not only the matter of the convenience of the people residing inland, but the principle of preserving the great country interests is involved.

I am, sir, &c,

HERBERT YEATES.

Written by macalba

June 10, 2010 at 8:07 pm

Railway services to the North will be maintained

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Wednesday 27 September 1933, The Sydney Morning Herald

OFFICIAL INQUIRY.

The Railway Commissioner (Mr. Hartigan) said yesterday that there never had been any intention to deprive Tenterfield or other districts north of Glen Innes of a daily mall train.

He added that he had directed official inquiries to be made into the proposal to discontinue the Brisbane express, via Wallangarra.

The Commissioner said that he had read with interest the protests contained in the special article in that morning’s “Herald” against a suggestion that the Brisbane express via Wallangarra might be discontinued.

“Pending the inquiries which are being conducted at my direction,” said Mr. Hartigan, “I do not wish to traverse the statements that have been made by representatives of the far northern towns and districts which are most concerned in the matter. When it was announced that these inquiries were being made, it was admitted that some grounds for protest might be found.

“It is only natural that people who have had the convenience of a long established railway service should be concerned at any suggestion that such a service is to be curtailed, modified, or eliminated. I should like to point out most distinctly, however, that there is no intention to deprive these towns and districts of an adequate railway service, or to do anything that would bring about the isolation suggested in the article.

“The simple facts,” Mr. Hartigan continued, “are that two fully-equipped trains leave Sydney every day, except Saturday, for the far northern towns. Before the direct, standard gauge route via the North Coast was opened up to Brisbane, the Brisbane express via Wallangarra, which leaves Sydney at 2 p.m., was not only an essential service, but was well patronised throughout the year. At 8.30 nightly, except Saturday, another fast fully equipped mall train leaves Sydney with Glen Innes (423 miles distant) as its terminus. Whether the Brisbane express is cut out or not will depend entirely upon the result of the analysis of the traffic it has carried over a period providing a fair trial of the requirements, but I want to make it clear that there has never been any intention to deprive Tenterfield or other districts north of Glen Innes of a daily mall train.

“The inquiries now going on are being made for the purpose of testing whether there is any sufficient reason for the running of two mail trains between Sydney and the Queensland border on six days a week. Whatever the result of this inquiry may be, it can be taken for granted that the interests of all concerned will be closely and fairly considered.”

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June 9, 2010 at 8:05 pm

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