Old news from Armidale and New England

Local news from newspaper archives

Posts Tagged ‘wollomombi

Governess wanted

leave a comment »

The Catholic Press (NSW : 1895 – 1942), Thursday 6 March 1913

SITUATIONS VACANT.

WANTED Cath. Governess to teach two (2) pupils Latin, French, piano, and ordinary English subjects. References required. State salary. Joseph Fitzgerald, Kunderang East, Wollomombi.

Written by macalba

April 30, 2013 at 9:03 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with ,

Double drowning at Wollomombi

leave a comment »

Friday 30 December 1904, The Sydney Morning Herald

HILLGROVE, Thursday.

Misses Nellie Gardiner, 18, and Fanny Kennedy, 12, were drowned whilst bathing this evening in the Wollomombi River. Mrs. Snape, wife of the landlord of the Wollomombi Hotel, attempted to rescue the drowning girls and almost lost her own life in the attempt.

Written by macalba

May 6, 2011 at 10:07 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with

Hillgrove merges; new church; inquest

leave a comment »

Monday 6 August 1923, The Sydney Morning Herald

No objection has been made to the merging of Hillgrove Municipality into the Dumaresq Shire, and now the merger will be completed. During its life as one of the most famous old mining towns in New South Wales It is believed that about 20 tons of gold were taken from Hillgrove.

An anonymous friends has presented a new church to the parish of Kelly’s Plains, near Armidale. The old church is to be pulled down and the material used for a soldiers’ memorial hall.

Further inquiry into the death of Charles Patrick McCarthy, who was found shot dead at Marden Creek, was conducted at Wollomombi before the coroner (Mr. Purkiss). Witnesses said they had heard deceased threaten to take his life. The coroner returned a verdict that deceased died of a bullet wound self inflicted.

Written by macalba

November 2, 2010 at 8:01 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with , ,

Gas lighting, and fish stocks

leave a comment »

Tuesday 6 October 1885, The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser

(Armidale Express, Oct. 2.)

It is slated that Armidale is likely to be lighted with gas about the end of next week. The water that had accumulated in the tank was being pumped out yesterday in order to allow of some work being done at the bottom of the holder. When this is completed the tank will be filled and the process of gas making can be commenced.

Some of the young trout have already been liberated in the Wollomombi river, and were carried most successfully, not one being lost. The Gara River will be stocked in several places, the Wollomumbi in two places, and a good number of young fish will be turned into the Apsley. There are also small lots to go into the Ollera, Boorolong, and Roumalla creeks, and a consignment has already been taken out for Aberfoyle.

Written by macalba

September 21, 2010 at 8:06 pm

Death of Mr. Donald Cameron

leave a comment »

Monday 28 May 1906, The Sydney Morning Herald

ARMIDALE. Saturday.

Mr. Donald Cameron, who was 70 years of age, and a very old resident of the New England district, died at his residence, Fassifern, this morning. While he was returning from church last Sunday the deceased gentleman fell from his horse owing to the bursting of a blood-vessel on the brain. He never regained consciousness. Mr. Cameron, who followed grazing, leaves a large property in the Chandler River district, where his wife and some members of the family reside.

Written by macalba

September 19, 2010 at 8:01 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with ,

Hail damage at Wollomombi

leave a comment »

Thursday 16 December 1858, The Maitland Mercury & Hunter River General Advertiser

NEW ENGLAND.

(From the Armidale Express, Dec. 11.)

WOLLOMOMBI.

A violent hailstorm fell over this place on Saturday last, such as has not occurred in the memory of any of its oldest inhabitants, and several persons on the station at the time – some who had been for many years in the colony, and some natives – never recollect having seen anything of the kind. Even the blacks had never seen the like before. It lasted half an hour, and though the hailstones were not of any extraordinary size, yet, from their violence they cut up every thing within their influence. The creek rose to a height not exceeded in the great rains of 1857, and such a body of hailstones had collected that they came down the creek in a mass and it was strange to see the water flowing under the hail when it was collected by the turns and narrowings of the creek. The garden, which was in a very flourishing condition, is now a complete wreck, the soil in many parts being washed away to the clay bottom ; and on the banks of the creek a solid mass of hailstones upwards of 4 feet deep lay deposited and what renders it curious, notwithstanding the season of the year, it has not disappeared up to the present time, and is, in places out of the influence of the sun, lying to a depth of nearly three feet ! Strange to say, the hail and indeed the rain, seem to have been confined to the one spot for nothing of the kind was experienced half a mile from it.

You may rely on the truth of this statement.

Halls Cattle Station, Wollomombi, Nov. 22nd., 1858

Written by macalba

September 15, 2010 at 8:01 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with

Road report: Armidale to Kempsey

leave a comment »

Friday 8 October 1937, The Sydney Morning Herald

Reporting on the road from Armidale to Kempsey the N.R.M.A. states that the run to Wollombi [sic] is over a fair to good metal and gravel surface. Steep grades and winding road require the exercise of care on the Big Hill between the summit of the range and George’s Creek, on the Upper Macleay River. At St. Helena Creek a detour is necessary because of the construction of a new bridge, and careful driving is advised. The road down the Macleay River to Bellbrook and Kempsey is very narrow and winding in places, and the going is slow. For the last l8 miles to West Kempsey much of the gravel surface is worn and corrugated. This road passes through fine scenery. Although the total distance from Armidale to Kempsey is slightly under 120 miles the average time for the trip is five hours.

Written by macalba

August 1, 2010 at 8:02 pm

Mountain resorts of New South Wales

leave a comment »

Monday 13 January 1890, The Sydney Morning Herald

Those desirous of escaping for a brief period from the heat and dust of the metropolis or the inland country districts during the summer months to the cool, salubrious climate of the mountains, will find ample facilities provided by the Railway Commissioners for so doing. On the Southern line tickets are issued at excursion rates from all stations to those between Mittagong and Goulburn, the former place being 2069ft. above sea level, and the latter about the same, the atmosphere being generally clear and invigorating. The mountains in the vicinity of Mittagong afford numerous pleasant walks, and are much frequented by excursionists during the summer months. Bowral is surrounded by very picturesque scenery, and, being well provided with hotel and lodging accommodation, is a favourite place of resort, especially by invalids in search of health. Moss Vale, which is 2205ft. above sea level, excited the admiration of Mr. J. A. Froude, who compared it to the famous Victorian sanatorium Mount Macedon, only that, instead of being in the midst of dense forests, it is surrounded by rolling grassy uplands, thickly sprinkled with trees, cattle farms, sheep &c., and long ago taken up and appropriated. “To those who are fond of riding,” says Mr. Froude, “the situation of Moss Vale is perfect as the green grass stretches out into infinity.” The climate is delightful to the visitor from Sydney or Albury it is like passing from the tropics into the temperate zone. The celebrated Fitzroy Falls are in the vicinity, while the rugged ravine in which the Berrima coal mines are situated can be reached by a walk of about seven miles. Several pleasant excursions may also be made from Goulbourn, one of the healthiest cities in Australia, the principal being that to the Wombeyan Caves, to which a new road is being made from Bowral.

At Bulli and Wollongong, on the South Coast line, visitors will find abundant opportunities for reaching the more elevated portions of the Illawarra Range, including the Bulli Pass with its magnificent panoramic views and enjoying the cooling ocean breezes sweeping over the lovely valley below.

On the Northern line several of the more distant townships are delightfully situated, especially after ascending the Moonbi Ranges, on the further side of which is Walcha-road, 320 miles from Sydney and 12 from the township, where the surrounding scenery resembles in many respects that of tho Blue Mountains. It is 3346ft. above sea level, and looking southward, the peaks of the Liverpool Range are seen, while, rising like many islands, are the heads of mountain chains extending as far as the eye can reach. About 16 miles south-east of Walcha are the magnificent Apsley Falls, one of the real beauty spots of New South Wales and destined to become one of the great attractions to visitors from other countries. The immense ravine in which they are situated is one of the grandest and most awe-inspiring in Australia, the sides of the gorge rising almost perpendicularly to the height or about 3000ft., causing it to resemble one of the great American canyons. The main falls are 240ft. deep, the others varying from 100ft., the volume of water pouring over the rocky lodges being enormously great. Armidale, 3313ft. above sea level, is often visited by those desirous of a trip to Dangar’s Falls, about 12 miles from the city. The principal fall is 780ft. deep, the depth of the whole series being estimated at 1500ft. The Woollomombi Falls, about 29 miles from Armidale, are on an equally grand scale, the scenery in both places partaking largely of the sublime. The line continues ascending until the highest and coolest point, Ben Lomond, 4560ft. above sea-level, is reached, after which it gradually descends towards the Queensland border. The greater portion of this elevated region, although familiar to the prospector, the pastoralist, and the agriculturist, is virgin land to the tourist, who will find many beautiful places and romantic localities which have yet to be described by pen or pencil.

Of the Blue Mountain resorts on the Western line there is little that is fresh to be said, but in the principal townships there has been a considerable increase of hotel and lodging accommodation, with improved facilities for visiting the more distant points of interest, there now being a good coach-road from Katoomba and Mount Victoria to the Jenolan Caves. The Railway Commissioners have arranged the train service so as to meet, as far as possible, the requirements of visitors, especially those whose time is limited, so that the various sights can be reached either in the course of a prolonged trip or during a series of short excursions, as may be found most convenient. The coach journey to the Jenolan Caves is very pleasant, and now that the caves are illuminated by electricity, their marvellous beauty becomes more clearly revealed. At Wellington, 995ft. above sea level, the famous caves, similarly named, are much frequented during the summer months, and possess many points of interest.

Written by macalba

June 17, 2010 at 8:07 pm

Alleged share hawking

leave a comment »

Monday 24 January 1938, The Sydney Morning Herald

ALLEGED SHARE HAWKING.
Charge Against Manager.

WITNESS FLOOD-BOUND.
ARMIDALE. Sunday.

The case of alleged share hawking against Arnold Lovell, 46, manager entered upon the third day of hearing at the Armidale Police Court on Saturday morning before Mr G. J. Johnstone, P.M. It was announced that one witness was flood-bound at his home at Wollomombi and would not be able to attend the Court until Monday.

John Macansh Hudson, grazier of Bannweera Station, near Uralla, said that he had been interviewed at Balala woolshed, near Uralla, by Lovell who had stated that Hamiltons (Australasia), Ltd. were amalgamating with Trade Credits (Australasia), Ltd. and in order to dispose of the Hamilton shares (as witness wished) it would be necessary to transfer the Hamilton shares to Trade Credits.

To Mr. Spender, K.C. (for the defence) witness said that he had asked Lovell to sell the Hamilton shares on his behalf. A transfer was the best that he could do to carry out witness’s instructions. No money was to pass. The witness said that Lovell had negotiated a loan of £600 for him on Hamilton shares.

Clara Isabella Cameron, widow, of Fassifern near Wollomombi, said that in July or August 1937, Lovell had told her that Hamiltons were being absorbed by Trade Credits and she would not get her dividends from Hamiltons unless she transferred to Trade Credits.

To Mr. Spender she said that she had received her dividends after the transfer of the shares.

The hearing was adjourned until to-morrow.

Written by macalba

May 11, 2010 at 2:03 pm

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with ,

The late Mr. A. A. Cameron

leave a comment »

Monday 21 November 1927, The Sydney Morning Herald

Probate has been granted of the will of the late Mr. Angus Alexander Cameron, grazier, of Fassifern, near Wollomombi, who died on June 2 last, leaving an estate of the net value of £20,881. The testator, who was 53 years of age, appointed his brother, John Cameron, of Hillgrove, and John Lorimer Gibson Johnstone, of Armidale, his executors and trustees. He left a legacy of £2000 to his sister, Christina Margaret Cameron, an annuity of £160 to his mother, Christina Cameron, and the residue of the estate to his widow.

Written by macalba

May 11, 2010 at 6:02 am

Posted in Uncategorized

Tagged with ,